“God bless us, everyone.” Quotable Closing Lines

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I can appreciate there are those who don’t like Top 10 lists but I tend to enjoy them because of getting to find out the favorites of fellow film lovers. Also, reminiscing about my best-loved movies that perhaps I haven’t thought about for a while.

 

 

Closing lines can serve as punctuation, the cherry on top. They can also, wrap up the film. One-liners that recall the movie all over again. Often times these are the quotes we remember most and become representative of the movie’s theme.

There are way too many movies to choose from so these are just a sampling that made this particular list. I love the Top 2 but as I was watching so many other films came to mind.

Please, let me know in the comments some of your best quotes. I’m looking forward to reading them.

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Spoiler Alert: I make it a point to never reveal a film’s ending because it’s a matter of courtesy. Don’t spoil the movie!

 

Although not closing, a few choice quotes:

Charlie Chaplin – The Great Dictator (1940)

Peter Lorre – Maltese Falcon (1941)

 

Colin Clive -Frankenstein (1931)

 

Wallace Shawn – Princess Bride (1987)

 

Paul Reubens- Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)

 

Clevon Little – Blazing Saddles (1974)

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My Top 3 Picks for Brilliant Movie Endings!

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The Usual Suspects

Psycho

Seven

Spoiler Alert! 

*As a matter of principal, I never reveal movie endings. So, please don’t divulge these.

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Number 3

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Seven (1995)

Okay, I’m a firm believer that not being shown everything can sometimes be more powerful than exposing it. We didn’t need to see the contents of the box at the end of the movie because the tension and reaction from both Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt were palpable. Wow!

This outstanding, psychological thriller was directed by David Fincher and stars Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Kevin Spacey. It was nominated for Best Film Editing at the 68th Academy Awards but lost out to Apollo 13.

The entire movie was one of those peek through your fingers experiences. Just when you thought you’d seen it all, the next shot was more horrific than the first. What a roller coaster ride!

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Number 2

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Psycho (1960)

Believe it or not, I saw this Hitchcock classic in the theater when it first came out. I was 5-years-old and I’m still a little paranoid going into the bathroom!

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Starring Anthony Perkins, and Janet Leigh, this classic horror-thriller is pure genius and a prime example why Alfred Hitchcock is the “Master of Suspense.” You believe he’s telling one story and suddenly everything is flipped on its ear. Who kills off the lead 1/3 way through the film and gets you to feel sympathetic toward the killer? I still can only watch Psycho during the daytime.

Initially, Hitch was not supported in the making of this little gem to the chagrin of “The Master.” Theater-goer lines were wrapped around the block hyped by a “No Admittance” policy after the start of the movie.

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The ending shot still haunts me and remains an amazing ending to one disturbing flick!

 

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My number 1 choice for brilliant movie endings is without a doubt!

 

The Usual Suspects (1995)

Usual suspects poster

The name Keyser Söze will forever be synonymous with one of the greatest cons ever perpetrated in cinema history.

This crime thriller masterpiece was directed by Bryan Singer and written by Christopher McQuarrie. It stars Kevin Spacey, Gabriel Byrne, Benicio del Toro, Kevin Pollak, Chazz Palminteri, and Stephen Baldwin.

Kevin Spacey’s portrayal of Roger “Verbal” Kint is compelling and flawless! He’s placed in numerous “best villain” lists over the years, including AFI’s 100 Years…100 Heroes & Villains. Spacey won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, turning him from a character actor into a star.

I have so many favorite scenes, it’s hard to pick just one. However, besides the ending, this rates. I crack up just thinking about it, so posting this was a hilarious endeavor!

One of the best parts of watching this film has got to be re-watching it to look back at all the elements of this fantastic set-up!

Love it, Love it, Love it!!

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These are just a few of the myriad of essential movies to ponder.

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Let me know some of your favorites in the comments.

 

 

“God bless us, everyone.” Quotable Closing Lines

Image result for movies

I can appreciate there are those who don’t like Top 10 lists but I tend to enjoy them because of getting to find out the favorites of fellow film lovers. Also, reminiscing about my best-loved movies that perhaps I haven’t thought about for a while.

 

 

Closing lines can serve as punctuation, the cherry on top. They can also, wrap up the film. One-liners that recall the movie all over again. Often times these are the quotes we remember most and become representative of the movie’s theme.

There are way too many movies to choose from so these are just a sampling that made this particular list. I love the Top 2 but as I was watching so many other films came to mind.

Please, let me know in the comments some of your best quotes. I’m looking forward to reading them.

∴∴∴∴∴∴

Spoiler Alert: I make it a point to never reveal a film’s ending because it’s a matter of courtesy. Don’t spoil the movie!

 

Although not closing, a few choice quotes:

Charlie Chaplin – The Great Dictator (1940)

Peter Lorre – Maltese Falcon (1941)

 

Colin Clive -Frankenstein (1931)

 

Wallace Shawn – Princess Bride (1987)

 

Paul Reubens- Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)

 

Clevon Little – Blazing Saddles (1974)

The ultimate road trip movie!

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Thelma and Louise (1991)

25th Anniversary

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Sunday, August 21 and Wednesday, August 24

What do you get when you pair a bored housewife and a straight-laced waitress at a coffee shop who are best friends sick of what they’ve settled for in a moment of spontaneity deciding to escape the tedium of their everyday lives?

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Fathom Events, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and Park Circus invite you to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Thelma & Louise when it returns to select cinemas nationwide for a special two-day event on Sunday, August 21 and Wednesday, August 24 – 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. (local time)

Featuring a special introduction from film critic Ben Lyons talking about the legacy of Thelma & Louise and why, after 25 years, it is still considered the ultimate road trip movie.

Thelma & Louise is a 1991 American road film directed by Ridley Scott and written by Callie Khouri. It’s a story about best friends taking control of their lives and accepting the consequences; changing the outcome of the two-day vacation intended to take a break from their dreary lives.

When you think about it, Thelma (Susan Sarandon) and Louise (Geena Davis) invented the selfie. Susan Sarandon explained she thought her character would be the type to keep a record of their travels, so she improvised the moment. And what about Brad Pitt? What a way to make a splash on the movie scene!

Simon says everybody down on the floor!

Although power hasn’t really changed in Hollywood, Thelma and Louise was a very empowering female liberation film. I never give away endings but at the time I felt wow, finally a real kickass conclusion versus the candy coated type we usually get.

The film became a critical and commercial success, receiving six Academy Award nominations and winning one for Best Original Screenplay for Khouri. Scott was nominated for Best Director, and both Sarandon and Davis were nominated for Best Actress.

At its release, the movie stirred controversy. At the intersection of several genres, it is now considered a classic, influenced other films and artistic works, and became a landmark of feminist film. (Wikipedia)

It’s a perfect movie for an ultimate girl’s night out so grab your friends and don’t miss seeing this classic on the big screen!

 

For tickets: Thelma and Louise

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Josephine Baker – Beyond “Bronze Venus”

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Josephine Baker 1920’s

Josephine Baker is most celebrated as the “Bronze Venus” and her infamous “Banana Dance” in Paris c. 1927. However, the sum of her life is so much more! I was blown away by her boldness and sexual freedom, but it wasn’t until I saw the 1991 HBO movie starring Lynn Whitfield as Josephine Baker that I started doing research on her life. Whitfield won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special—becoming the first Black actress to win the award in this category which seems apropos since Josephine Baker was The Lady of firsts.

Lynn Whitfield - Josephine Baker Story 1991

Lynn Whitfield – Josephine Baker Story 1991

I’ve always been intrigued by Baker’s provocative reputation but had no idea of her involvement in the fight for justice, racial equality and the civil-rights movement.

Born  Freda Josephine McDonald in St. Louis, Missouri, (June 3, 1906 – April 12, 1975) she was an American-born French dancer, singer, and actress who came to be known in various circles as the “Black Pearl,” “Bronze Venus” and even the “Creole Goddess”. Her parents were Carrie McDonald and Vaudeville drummer Eddie Carson. Growing up poor she started working early cleaning homes and babysitting for wealthy white families.

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Baby Josephine

Baker dropped out of school at the age of 13 and lived as a street child in the slums of St. Louis. Her street-corner dancing attracted attention from the Dixie Steppers which lead to her opportunity to appear in the groundbreaking and hugely successful Broadway revue Shuffle Along (1921). She performed as the last dancer in the chorus line, a position where, traditionally, the dancer performed in a comic manner, as if she were unable to remember the dance, until the encore, at which point she would perform it not only correctly but with additional complexity. Baker’s act set in motion the career which would make her an international star.

 

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Josephine Baker dancing the Charleston, 1926

 

Josephine traveled to Paris, France, for a new venture, and opened in “La Revue Nègre” on October 2, 1925, at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées. Her erotic dancing and performing in next to nothing made her a sensation in Paris. The bohemian culture of interwar Paris embraced Baker’s skin color, allowing her to catapult to stardom. At the Folies Bergère, she performed the Danse Sauvage, wearing a costume consisting of a skirt made of a string of artificial bananas – voila! – a star is born.

 

 

Josephine Baker became the most successful and highest paid American entertainer working in France and the first Black woman to star in a major motion picture. Baker starred in three films which found success only in Europe: the silent film Siren of the Tropics (1927), Zouzou (1934) and Princesse Tam Tam (1935). She also starred in Fausse Alerte in 1940.

However, despite her acclaim in Europe, upon returning to New York in 1936  to star in the Ziegfeld Follies, she walked right back into good ole American racism. Audiences rejected the idea that a black woman could be so sophisticated and she was replaced by stripper Gypsy Rose Lee later in the run. Time magazine referred to her as a “Negro wench”. She returned to Europe heartbroken.

 

Josephine Baker and the French Resistance of World War II

Josephine returned to Paris in 1937, married a Jewish Frenchman, Jean Lion, and became a French citizen. In September 1939, when France declared war on Germany she was recruited by Deuxième Bureau, French military intelligence, as an “honorable correspondent”. Baker collected what information she could about German troop locations from officials she met at parties. She was awarded the Legion of Honor and given a Medal of Resistance for her work during World War II. She was also the first American woman to receive the Croix du Guerre, a notable French military honor.

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Josephine Baker Legion of Honor

 

 Josephine Baker and the Civil Rights Movement

Though based in France, Baker fought for American civil rights in the 1950’s and 1960’s. When she arrived in New York with her fourth husband French composer and conductor Jo Bouillon, they were refused reservations at 36 hotels because she was black. In 1951 when the famous New York Stork Club refused to serve Baker because she was black, she wrote letters to President Truman and enlisted the aid of the NAACP which focused a spotlight on the issues of inequality and racism in popular establishments.

 

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Stork Club Controversy

 

Josephine Baker was one of the few female speakers at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963 introducing “Negro Women Fighters for Freedom”, including Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Congressman John Lewis. The NAACP, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, named May 20th Josephine Baker Day in her honor.

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Josephine Baker in French uniform – March on Washington 1963

“The Rainbow Tribe”

Long before Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt’s multicultural family, there was Josephine Baker and her “Rainbow Tribe”. Josephine wanted to prove that “children of different ethnicities and religions could still be brothers.” Baker raised two daughters, French-born Marianne and Moroccan-born Stellina, and ten sons; Korean-born Jeannot (or Janot), Japanese-born Akio, Colombian-born Luis, Finnish-born Jari (now Jarry), French-born Jean-Claude and Noël, Israeli-born Moïse, Algerian-born Brahim, Ivorian-born Koffi, and Venezuelan-born Mara.

 

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Josephine Baker and “The Rainbow Tribe”

 

On April 12, 1975 we lost Josephine after she suffered a cerebral hemorrhage, she was 68 years old. She performed right up to her death, starring in a retrospective revue at the Bobino in Paris, Joséphine à Bobino 1975, celebrating her 50 years in show business.The opening night audience included Sophia Loren, Mick Jagger, Shirley Bassey, (best known for recording the theme song to the James Bond film Goldfinger (1964), Diana Ross, and Liza Minnelli.

20,000 people lined the streets of Paris to watch her funeral procession. She received a 21 gun salute, making her the first Black American female to be buried with military honors in France. Josephine Baker leaves behind a legacy of accomplishments including breaking color barriers and fighting for justice and equality around the world. I thank her for channeling her celebrity into championing the rights of all.

 

Celebration of Josephine’s Life and Legacy